Shared Meters – Look Out!

It’s a rare occurrence, but every now and then we come across shared water or gas meters when inspecting houses. This is most often the case with duplexes or other multi-family properties that may have once been single family homes but were later converted into two or more dwelling units. It’s easier to leave the existing meters in place, along with their main shut-off valves, but this poses a major potential problem that unsuspecting buyers could easily overlook. If the home has been divided and the water or gas shut-offs exist in only one unit, what do tenants who don’t live in that unit do in the event of an emergency? If a water line bursts and the tenant occupying the unit with the shut-off isn’t home, how can the other tenant access the shut-off to prevent major water damage? If a concerning gas leak is detected and the gas can’t be shut off in-line, how can the tenant get to the main gas shut-off to prevent a potential explosion?

At our inspection this morning, we came across a shared meter situation, but the configuration was even more problematic than the examples I just gave. The gas meter and shut-off for the house behind the one we were inspecting was located in the basement of the house we were inspecting (see the image below). The meter was labeled “rear” since it serves the house located behind the home. So, two separate houses with two separate gas meters, but both meters exist inside only one of the homes. Imagine your gas meter and shut-off being located in a neighbor’s house!

Needless to say, this poses a major potential issue. If the occupant of the rear property has an emergency and needs to shut off their gas, they can only do so by accessing the basement of someone else’s home! Again, what if that homeowner is gone or doesn’t grant access to the neighbor?

We contacted the gas company to discuss this issue and were informed that the meters were intentionally set up this way. A reason wasn’t given, but it was undoubtedly done for the sake of ease, and the configuration has likely been this way for some time. And contrary to what you might assume, utility companies are often allowed to set up meters however they see fit, leaving homeowners with little or no recourse.

The buyer in this case wasn’t too concerned that his neighbor’s gas meter was located in his basement and jokingly said they’d just have to be sure to get along well after he moves in. He was very glad we made him aware, though, and said, “Had you not told me, I could have been woken up by a bang on my door at two in the morning by my neighbor wanting to run into my basement and having no clue why!”

In all likelihood, there will never be an emergency that necessitates the neighbor quickly entering the other house to shut off the gas; but it could happen, and both property owners need to be aware and have a plan just in case. So, if you’re looking to buy a home, be sure to check the utility meters. You need to know the shut-off locations anyway, and hopefully you don’t run into any strange surprises like we did this morning!

*To visit our main website, go to http://www.hillinspections.com

Watch Out for THESE Bathroom Issues

Bathrooms are a major selling point with homes. I can’t even begin to count the number of times our clients have commented on how well they like (or dislike) the bathrooms in a house they are considering purchasing during the course of our inspections. When a bathroom is recently updated, it’s easy to like it; when it’s dated – well, not so much.

Beyond the looks, though, there are some fairly common issues you should look out for, as well as some features you’ll need to understand to properly maintain. Here are just a handful…

  1. Jetted tubs. If you’ve ever owned a jetted tub, you know they need to be cleaned. Unlike hot tubs that are chlorinated to remain sanitary, jetted tubs in bathrooms have no chemicals to keep them clean. A thin film of grime (usually black) forms in the jets, and it pours into the tub water once the jets are turned on. As a result, many people simply stop using their jets to make life easier (and less disgusting). But you don’t have to stop using your jets if you know how to properly clean the tub. To do so, simply fill the tub with water above the jets, pour in about a half cup of detergent or bleach, run the jets for 15 minutes, then drain the tub. Next, simply repeat the same steps but without the detergent. It’s that simple, and it will allow you to enjoy your relaxing jetted tub as intended.
  2. Carpet. Carpet and bathrooms just don’t mix. Carpet was fairly frequently installed in bathrooms several decades ago because of its comfort and warmth, but it’s rarely installed in bathrooms today… and for good reason. Carpet and the underlying pad are a breeding ground for contaminants like mold, fungus, bacteria and dirty residue. This is especially true around the base of toilets, but that goes without saying. Fortunately, replacing carpet is a rather simple task, and it’s one you should definitely consider to prevent an unwanted mess and promote sanitary conditions.
  3. Clearance Issues. It’s not uncommon for us to find inadequate clearances in bathrooms – especially around toilets, and especially when toilets have been added to small bathrooms. This may seem like a minor issue, but it’s not exactly comfortable to use a toilet when you don’t have sufficient space. Clearances around toilets should be at least 15-18 inches at the sides, which are the areas where clearance is most often lacking. Unfortunately, altering this often proves impractical, but it’s still something worth looking out for when you’re house shopping.
  4. Inadequate Ventilation. Bathrooms that have a shower or toilet need sufficient ventilation to expel hot, moisture-laden air and noxious odors. An openable window will usually suffice, but a more ideal option is a powered vent fan that more actively removes moisture and odors. Bathrooms with neither are usually centrally located and were usually added after the home was initially built. That’s because a window simply isn’t an option and it may be difficult to install a vent fan and duct, depending on the surrounding materials and living space. If it’s a simple half bath with a toilet and sink, ventilation isn’t usually as vital. If a shower exists, though, good ventilation is absolutely crucial to prevent microbial growth (like mold), loosened tiles and a host of other problems.
  5. Missing Shut-off Valves. This one usually occurs in older homes, but we still occasionally run across it in newer homes as well. Supply lines beneath bathroom sinks (and other sinks in a home) should have shut-off valves so the water can be shut off quickly and easily in the event of an emergency or necessary repair work that may come up. If you aren’t sure if your sinks have shut-offs, simply look beneath the sink in the base cabinet. The valves are very easy to spot, and it isn’t a bad idea to go ahead and test the valves to make sure they are working properly. If no shut-offs are visible, consider having them installed.

This list comprises only a few of the common bathroom issues we come across, but they are some of the most common and are easy to check on your own whether you’re touring different homes to buy or are wanting to make sure your current bathrooms are in great condition. Take a few minutes to absorb this information and you’ll be better prepared when you look over your bathrooms.

*To visit our main website, go to http://www.hillinspections.com