Watch Out for THESE Bathroom Issues

Bathrooms are a major selling point with homes. I can’t even begin to count the number of times our clients have commented on how well they like (or dislike) the bathrooms in a house they are considering purchasing during the course of our inspections. When a bathroom is recently updated, it’s easy to like it; when it’s dated – well, not so much.

Beyond the looks, though, there are some fairly common issues you should look out for, as well as some features you’ll need to understand to properly maintain. Here are just a handful…

  1. Jetted tubs. If you’ve ever owned a jetted tub, you know they need to be cleaned. Unlike hot tubs that are chlorinated to remain sanitary, jetted tubs in bathrooms have no chemicals to keep them clean. A thin film of grime (usually black) forms in the jets, and it pours into the tub water once the jets are turned on. As a result, many people simply stop using their jets to make life easier (and less disgusting). But you don’t have to stop using your jets if you know how to properly clean the tub. To do so, simply fill the tub with water above the jets, pour in about a half cup of detergent or bleach, run the jets for 15 minutes, then drain the tub. Next, simply repeat the same steps but without the detergent. It’s that simple, and it will allow you to enjoy your relaxing jetted tub as intended.
  2. Carpet. Carpet and bathrooms just don’t mix. Carpet was fairly frequently installed in bathrooms several decades ago because of its comfort and warmth, but it’s rarely installed in bathrooms today… and for good reason. Carpet and the underlying pad are a breeding ground for contaminants like mold, fungus, bacteria and dirty residue. This is especially true around the base of toilets, but that goes without saying. Fortunately, replacing carpet is a rather simple task, and it’s one you should definitely consider to prevent an unwanted mess and promote sanitary conditions.
  3. Clearance Issues. It’s not uncommon for us to find inadequate clearances in bathrooms – especially around toilets, and especially when toilets have been added to small bathrooms. This may seem like a minor issue, but it’s not exactly comfortable to use a toilet when you don’t have sufficient space. Clearances around toilets should be at least 15-18 inches at the sides, which are the areas where clearance is most often lacking. Unfortunately, altering this often proves impractical, but it’s still something worth looking out for when you’re house shopping.
  4. Inadequate Ventilation. Bathrooms that have a shower or toilet need sufficient ventilation to expel hot, moisture-laden air and noxious odors. An openable window will usually suffice, but a more ideal option is a powered vent fan that more actively removes moisture and odors. Bathrooms with neither are usually centrally located and were usually added after the home was initially built. That’s because a window simply isn’t an option and it may be difficult to install a vent fan and duct, depending on the surrounding materials and living space. If it’s a simple half bath with a toilet and sink, ventilation isn’t usually as vital. If a shower exists, though, good ventilation is absolutely crucial to prevent microbial growth (like mold), loosened tiles and a host of other problems.
  5. Missing Shut-off Valves. This one usually occurs in older homes, but we still occasionally run across it in newer homes as well. Supply lines beneath bathroom sinks (and other sinks in a home) should have shut-off valves so the water can be shut off quickly and easily in the event of an emergency or necessary repair work that may come up. If you aren’t sure if your sinks have shut-offs, simply look beneath the sink in the base cabinet. The valves are very easy to spot, and it isn’t a bad idea to go ahead and test the valves to make sure they are working properly. If no shut-offs are visible, consider having them installed.

This list comprises only a few of the common bathroom issues we come across, but they are some of the most common and are easy to check on your own whether you’re touring different homes to buy or are wanting to make sure your current bathrooms are in great condition. Take a few minutes to absorb this information and you’ll be better prepared when you look over your bathrooms.

*To visit our main website, go to http://www.hillinspections.com

Author: hillinspections

I am a Certified Professional Inspector (CPI) and the owner and operator of Hill Property Inspections LLC, the top-rated inspection company in the greater Johnstown, PA area, based out of western Pennsylvania. I specialize in property inspections and environmental testing services and have a passion for helping my own clients and other families in learning to properly maintain their homes. I am an Army veteran, former State Farm Insurance Agent, and real estate investor with experience in all facets of real estate construction, transaction and insurance. I am also the founder and President of the Southwestern PA Chapter of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) and an affiliate member of the Cambria-Somerset Association of Realtors (CSAR).

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