Shared Meters – Look Out!

It’s a rare occurrence, but every now and then we come across shared water or gas meters when inspecting houses. This is most often the case with duplexes or other multi-family properties that may have once been single family homes but were later converted into two or more dwelling units. It’s easier to leave the existing meters in place, along with their main shut-off valves, but this poses a major potential problem that unsuspecting buyers could easily overlook. If the home has been divided and the water or gas shut-offs exist in only one unit, what do tenants who don’t live in that unit do in the event of an emergency? If a water line bursts and the tenant occupying the unit with the shut-off isn’t home, how can the other tenant access the shut-off to prevent major water damage? If a concerning gas leak is detected and the gas can’t be shut off in-line, how can the tenant get to the main gas shut-off to prevent a potential explosion?

At our inspection this morning, we came across a shared meter situation, but the configuration was even more problematic than the examples I just gave. The gas meter and shut-off for the house behind the one we were inspecting was located in the basement of the house we were inspecting (see the image below). The meter was labeled “rear” since it serves the house located behind the home. So, two separate houses with two separate gas meters, but both meters exist inside only one of the homes. Imagine your gas meter and shut-off being located in a neighbor’s house!

Needless to say, this poses a major potential issue. If the occupant of the rear property has an emergency and needs to shut off their gas, they can only do so by accessing the basement of someone else’s home! Again, what if that homeowner is gone or doesn’t grant access to the neighbor?

We contacted the gas company to discuss this issue and were informed that the meters were intentionally set up this way. A reason wasn’t given, but it was undoubtedly done for the sake of ease, and the configuration has likely been this way for some time. And contrary to what you might assume, utility companies are often allowed to set up meters however they see fit, leaving homeowners with little or no recourse.

The buyer in this case wasn’t too concerned that his neighbor’s gas meter was located in his basement and jokingly said they’d just have to be sure to get along well after he moves in. He was very glad we made him aware, though, and said, “Had you not told me, I could have been woken up by a bang on my door at two in the morning by my neighbor wanting to run into my basement and having no clue why!”

In all likelihood, there will never be an emergency that necessitates the neighbor quickly entering the other house to shut off the gas; but it could happen, and both property owners need to be aware and have a plan just in case. So, if you’re looking to buy a home, be sure to check the utility meters. You need to know the shut-off locations anyway, and hopefully you don’t run into any strange surprises like we did this morning!

*To visit our main website, go to http://www.hillinspections.com

Author: hillinspections

I am a Certified Professional Inspector (CPI) and the owner and operator of Hill Property Inspections LLC, the top-rated inspection company in the greater Johnstown, PA area, based out of western Pennsylvania. I specialize in property inspections and environmental testing services and have a passion for helping my own clients and other families in learning to properly maintain their homes. I am an Army veteran, former State Farm Insurance Agent, and real estate investor with experience in all facets of real estate construction, transaction and insurance. I am also the founder and President of the Southwestern PA Chapter of the International Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) and an affiliate member of the Cambria-Somerset Association of Realtors (CSAR).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s