Shared Meters – Look Out!

It’s a rare occurrence, but every now and then we come across shared water or gas meters when inspecting houses. This is most often the case with duplexes or other multi-family properties that may have once been single family homes but were later converted into two or more dwelling units. It’s easier to leave the existing meters in place, along with their main shut-off valves, but this poses a major potential problem that unsuspecting buyers could easily overlook. If the home has been divided and the water or gas shut-offs exist in only one unit, what do tenants who don’t live in that unit do in the event of an emergency? If a water line bursts and the tenant occupying the unit with the shut-off isn’t home, how can the other tenant access the shut-off to prevent major water damage? If a concerning gas leak is detected and the gas can’t be shut off in-line, how can the tenant get to the main gas shut-off to prevent a potential explosion?

At our inspection this morning, we came across a shared meter situation, but the configuration was even more problematic than the examples I just gave. The gas meter and shut-off for the house behind the one we were inspecting was located in the basement of the house we were inspecting (see the image below). The meter was labeled “rear” since it serves the house located behind the home. So, two separate houses with two separate gas meters, but both meters exist inside only one of the homes. Imagine your gas meter and shut-off being located in a neighbor’s house!

Needless to say, this poses a major potential issue. If the occupant of the rear property has an emergency and needs to shut off their gas, they can only do so by accessing the basement of someone else’s home! Again, what if that homeowner is gone or doesn’t grant access to the neighbor?

We contacted the gas company to discuss this issue and were informed that the meters were intentionally set up this way. A reason wasn’t given, but it was undoubtedly done for the sake of ease, and the configuration has likely been this way for some time. And contrary to what you might assume, utility companies are often allowed to set up meters however they see fit, leaving homeowners with little or no recourse.

The buyer in this case wasn’t too concerned that his neighbor’s gas meter was located in his basement and jokingly said they’d just have to be sure to get along well after he moves in. He was very glad we made him aware, though, and said, “Had you not told me, I could have been woken up by a bang on my door at two in the morning by my neighbor wanting to run into my basement and having no clue why!”

In all likelihood, there will never be an emergency that necessitates the neighbor quickly entering the other house to shut off the gas; but it could happen, and both property owners need to be aware and have a plan just in case. So, if you’re looking to buy a home, be sure to check the utility meters. You need to know the shut-off locations anyway, and hopefully you don’t run into any strange surprises like we did this morning!

*To visit our main website, go to http://www.hillinspections.com

Common Defects: Downspouts

One of the most common defects uncovered during a home inspection is downspouts that aren’t extended far enough from the foundation. The purpose of gutters and downspouts is to redirect rain water away from the house that would otherwise pool up near the foundation and possibly cause structural damage over time. Rain water hits the roof, flows down into the gutters, over to the downspouts (because the gutters slope slightly downward), and finally (hopefully!) away from the foundation.

Often, downspouts terminate with a short “elbow” near the ground and nothing else. In this case, the water will exit right next to the foundation, seep into the soil, and exert pressure on the foundation. As you can imagine, the downspouts in a case like this are doing very little, if anything, to prevent water intrusion. A popular add-on is splash blocks, which are concrete blocks designed to do what their name suggests. Unfortunately, splash blocks don’t do the best job of redirecting water away from the house. On the contrary, they often settle into the soil they sit on and eventually cause a negative slope that allows water to flow back toward the foundation.

If downspouts don’t terminate directly onto the ground, they connect to drain pipes below grade that feed into a “tile” system. This is a very popular method and can certainly work well, but from an inspection standpoint (whether it’s a homeowner or certified inspector doing the inspecting), nothing below grade is readily visible, so the exact condition and function of these systems underground can’t be determined. Furthermore, if the downspouts and/or pipes below grade get clogged, removing the debris can be difficult and costly.

So what’s the best solution? Simple! Add downspout extensions to the bottom elbows of the downspouts that redirect water at least 5-6 feet away from the foundation. This solution is the best of every world: cheap, easy to install on your own, and easy to inspect or unclog whenever necessary. The only downside is that this solution often requires moving the downspout extensions when the lawn needs mowed. This is a small sacrifice, though, when you consider the many benefits this easy option provides. If your downspouts currently terminate into a below-grade tile system and you wish to use the method described, you can cut the gutters, cap the old piping, and add elbows and extensions to the downspouts.

Last but not least… gutters and downspouts are an important part of preventing water intrusion, but they are not the only important part. Every bit as important is ensuring that the grading around the foundation is sloped away from the house. Even downspout extensions that run 5-6 feet away from the foundation won’t be effective if the soil runs toward the house. The water will simply exit the extension and flow right back toward the foundation. So, step one is ensuring that the soil around your home is sloped away from the home, and step two is ensuring that your downspouts have extensions that carry water a minimum of 5-6 feet away. Do this and you’ll be able to rest at ease knowing you’ve taken the simple and necessary steps to keep water away from your home.

*To visit our main website, go to http://www.hillinspections.com